Tree pruning help

Tree services firm in Colorado Springs? Not enough water is harmful for the tree, but too much water is bad as well. Over-watering is a common tree care mistake. Please note that moist is different than soggy, and you can judge this by feel. A damp soil that dries for a short period will allow adequate oxygen to permeate the soil. You can check soil moisture by using a garden trowel and inserting it into the ground to a depth of 2″, and then move the blade of the trowel back and forth to create a small narrow trench. Then use your finger to touch the soil. If it is moist to the touch, then they do not need water.

Do you want to keep your trees healthy? First we will suggest some tips on tree care and after that we will introduce Tree Artisans, a tree services company in Colorado Springs. Not enough water is harmful for the tree, but too much water is bad as well. Over-watering is a common tree care mistake. Please note that moist is different than soggy, and you can judge this by feel. A damp soil that dries for a short period will allow adequate oxygen to permeate the soil. You can check soil moisture by using a garden trowel and inserting it into the ground to a depth of 2″, and then move the blade of the trowel back and forth to create a small narrow trench. Then use your finger to touch the soil. If it is moist to the touch, then they do not need water.

Mulching is the most beneficial thing a home owner can do for the health of a young tree. Mulches are materials placed on the soil surface to improve soil structure, oxygen levels, temperature and moisture availability. Properly applied, mulch can give landscapes a handsome, well-groomed appearance. Ideally, growing trees should be fertilized throughout the year. The greatest amounts should be applied during the early spring and summer months. Several light applications a year are preferred as the tree gets older. Trees don’t need humans to grow. Most trees thrive where they are planted, but humans sometimes inadvertently damage the trees they’re hoping to showcase. Just parking a car underneath a tree regularly can damage the tree by tamping down the ground too hard, making it difficult for the roots to grow and shift in the soil. Many times, homeowners want to build a structure near or around a beautiful tree to have the tree enhance the final construction project. Don’t do it! When construction is too close to trees it can damage their roots and growth space. Roots need two to three times the length of branches to grow enough to support a tree. Be sure to discuss what your trees need with a contractor, and mark off places where you don’t want construction vehicles to drive or park.

Compacted soil: When you plant a tree in your backyard, the roots need room to spread out. This can be difficult when planting in compacted soil and heavy clay. Poor quality, compacted soil is an especially common problem if your home has been recently built, as many contractors use construction fill – soil scraped from other sites which may include debris – to shape the landscape. If the tree’s roots have no room to grow and face constant soil pressure, the result may be crushed roots, poor water and nutrient uptake, and stunted growth. You can counter this threat by using best practice planting methods along with vertical mulching or mixing in organic matter into the compacted soil. The Morton Arboretum has an excellent video primer on planting trees. Discover more info on Tree stump services in Colorado Springs.

Searching for the best choices if you want to cut down the tree maintenance costs? Start with picking the right trees for Colorado! Nancy is a big fan of American Hornbeams, in part because of the striking patterns on their bark. The beautifully textured bark is sinewy, like well-developed muscles on an athlete. No surprise that the tree is also known as a “Musclewood!” Another remarkable feature of this Hornbeam is the pagoda-shaped fruit it produces in the fall. Fall leaf color is a mottled yellow and red. The fruit and the bark give this tree an especially elegant appearance in a winter landscape. American Hornbeams grow 25 to 30 feet tall and wide. They have a moderate growth rate. This Hornbeam should be watered normally for the first three years. They are somewhat drought tolerant once established.

Some common tree pests found in late spring and summer include borers, mites, scales, and beetles. They can cause wilting, canopy thinning, premature leaf drop, and branch dieback. Many of these insects feed on various types of deciduous and evergreen species. Treatments – including the release of beneficial insects – can suppress the impact of damaging pests. Examples of natural predators to these pests include lady beetles, green lacewings, trichogramma wasps, and predaceous mites.